On Saturday, September 29th, protesters – inspired by the recent Occupy Wall Street uprising in New York City – set up camp on the lawns of City Hall in Downtown Los Angeles. Over the past week, the haphazardly organized group has grown to more than 300 campers and continues to grow.

Turning the lawns of City Hall into a stage for political debate, OccupyLA packs each day with workshops, classes, and discussion forums. The movement takes issue with corporate corruption and how that has influenced the political process and with the shift of wealth and favor towards the wealthiest 1% of the population.

“We have become of the corporations, by the corporations and for the corporations – people don’t matter anymore. I love our country, I just don’t like what we’ve become,” said protestor Anastasia Stewart, 78, who has been actively protesting with the occupants for the past four days.

Terry Marshall, a Music Therapy and Child Development major at California State University, Northridge camped over the weekend with a handful of her classmates. She said she believes that we (Americans) should have more of a say in what our government does and what goes on in the country. Marshall decided to camp because she is concerned with the state of the education system and believes the government should be putting more money into education.

“How can we expect kids to progress in this country without education?” said Marshall.

Since its inception in New York, the occupation movement has swept across the globe  and now includes up to 66 U.S. cities and several cities in Europe and Canada. Unlike its counterparts in New York and San Francisco, where protestors have cited multiple complaints of police brutality, the Los Angeles occupation has remained peaceful and received much support from the local police and officials.

Occupants have stated that they are not planning on vacating City Hall’s lawns anytime soon.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s